An Early Earth Predisposed to Phosphorylation of Organics

Presenter: Matthew Pasek, University of South Florida
When: November 26, 2013 3PM PST

The element phosphorus is important in the development and possibly origin of life on the earth. The formation of phosphorylated organics, such as those found in all life today, does not occur easily under plausible prebiotic conditions. Here I present new results on the chemistry of phosphorus in the Archean as sampled from the 3.52 billion year old limestone that shows a fundamental difference between archean phosphorus and the modern phosphate cycle. Additionally, I will show how these differences could have influenced the prebiotic chemistry of early environments from a “just add water” perspective.

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